English sculptor Antony Gormley has had a noteworthy career, with art being shown all over the world for over three decades. While we all know his famous Angel of the North, his work extends far beyond this monumental masterpiece. With a heavy emphasis on the human form and how it interacts with the space around it, Gormley’s craftsmanship is not only aesthetically perplexing (and therefore pleasing!) but also highly intentional and thought-provoking. So, without further ado, KAZoART is pleased to present a few of his career highlights.

#1 Sculpture for Derry Walls (1987)

Sculpture for Derry Walls (1987). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

Working in the birthplace of his grandfather, Gormley installed three cast iron figures on the city walls in Derry in 1987. One was overlooking the Foyle River, another was standing over the Bogside by the remains of the Walker Monument and the last on the Bastion overlooking the Fountain Estate. The sculptures, which are not only in cruciform but also very politically-charged hit a nerve among some of the locals. As two figures stand cast back-to-back, they look in different directions. They are together but separate. This served as the artist’s commentary on the deep rift between the two dominant religious communities in Northern Ireland: the Protestants and Catholics. Paradoxically united as one under their nationality and yet completely divided as a society. Two of the sculptures were taken down but one was gifted to the city by Gormley.

Sculpture for Derry Walls (1987). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

#2 Another Place (1997)

Another Place (1997). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

Originally installed in Cuxhaven, Germany, and now permanently set up on Crosby Beach in the U.K., Gormley’s Another Place stretches along 2.5 kilometres of coastline and 1 kilometre out to the sea. Made up of one hundred solid castings of Gormley’s body in various poses but always with expanded lungs, the figures are spaced out on a varying grid. Those further out at sea are over their head in water at high tide and covered in barnacles. Those closer to the shore are buried up to their ankles and knees in sand. Each is subject to the ebb and flow of the ocean’s tide, enduring the storms but also the sunny days. To the artist, this installation is less about the space the figures take up and more about what exists between them. Stoically posed, one cannot help but feel a sense of solitude when standing amongst them for they mimic our form but have an element of impassivity with which we cannot relate.

Another Place (1997). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com
Another Place (1997). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

#3 Inside Australia (2002-2003)

Inside Australia (2002-2003). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

Made up of fifty-one life-size metal sculptures, Inside Australia is situated on Lake Ballard in Western Australia and spreads for ten square kilometres. It was created by taking moulds of people around the Menzies community. Once in production, however, the sculpture’s body sizes were shrunk to be abut 80 percent thinner than the average human. These emaciated figures are scattered about on the dry lake bed. Gormley said that he aimed to “achieve the highest level of tension between mass and space with highly concentrated and individualised bodyforms.” As they walk from sculpture to sculpture, visitors leave footprints and traces of their paths. When viewed from a nearby ironstone mound, the presence of the spectators and their footpaths connects the distant metal figures.

Inside Australia (2002-2003). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com
Inside Australia (2002-2003). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

#4 Domain Field (2003)

Domain Field (2003). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

Created with the help of individuals aged two to eighty-five, all of the sculptures are casts of residents from the Newcastle and Gateshead community. Once their moulds were taken, Gormley and a team of experts weld together metal bars within each mould in order to properly take up the space their body would have. Gormley prods the viewers to not only consider the space we occupy but also those that were there before us. The final product was 287 sculptures spread out over the 8,000 square metre exhibition space of the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead.

Domain Field (2003). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com
Domain Field (2003). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

#5 Wasteman (2006)

Wasteman (2006). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

A pinnacle moment in Penny Woolcock’s Margate Exodus, Wasteman took six weeks to construct and only thirty-two minutes to burn to the ground. Of the project, Gormley said, “Some works are made in wax to be cast in bronze; this was made in domestic waste to be cast in fire.” In deed, it was made up of everyday household rubbish such as chairs, desks, toilet seats, or as the artist says, “all the limiting baggage of the householder”. The spectacle took place on what was a fairground; thirty tonnes of waste set ablaze as Gormley turned junk into energy.

Wasteman (2006). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com
Wasteman (2006). Image Courtesy of AntonyGormley.com

Gormley-inspired sculpture on KAZoART

Much like Antony Gormley, KAZoART sculptor, Jean-Marc Martinez
principally works with metal. His creations are elegant and powerful, innovative yet relatable. Varied in subject matter, he presents us with a wide choice of expertly-crafted figurative and abstract sculptures.

Jean-Marc Martinez, Courbe, metal sculpture. (20 x 47)
Jean-Marc Martinez, El cordobes, metal sculpture. (20 x 80)