Impressionist Artists

KAZoART has gathered here its artists who revisit and reinvent the work of the Impressionist masters. The works of our modern day impressionist artists will enchant you with their invigorating and shimmering colours that echo those of Monet or Renoir. 

Famous Impressionist Artists

Impressionist artists wanted to introduce a new pictorial language and change the way of painting and creating. When they left the workshops and settled on the banks of the Seine or on the seaside, they sought to breathe new life into art and its traditions. The Royal Academy of Paris did not condone these practices as they were not in keeping with the “academic art” that governed the world of art.

Painting everyday life and playing with the effects of light were the two areas of interest for artists such as Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Gustave Caillebotte, Auguste Renoir, Berthe Morisot and Edgar Degas. However, these artists did not wish to paint a frozen reality, in the same way that photography could do, but rather to sublimate the charming moments of everyday life through the use of bright colours applied with virtuosity. It was thanks to the agile brushstrokes of the impressionist artists who were not afraid to break tradition and favour the depiction of movement, light and realistic subjects that we have this movement. 

Impressionism: its techniques, its mediums, its definitions

Impressionism is an artistic trend that emerged in France at the end of the 19th century. Born of frustrations and disagreements with the Royal Academy along with numerous exhibition refusals at prestigious salons, impressionist artists rebelled against the artistic standards of their time. They instead decided to portray a pictorial universe that would no longer be suppressed by the artistic institutions that had governed them up until that point.

Thus impressionist artists often paint small canvases, taking daily life and nature as their main subjects. Such subjects were situated on the lowest level in the hierarchy amongst the genres established by the Royal Academy. Pictorially speaking, their touch is imprecise, the color is applied to the canvas with small strokes and it is very often up to the viewer’s eye to mix the colours and recognise the pattern.

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